Ce a citit Barack Obama în 2017. Cărțile lui preferate

Barack Obama și-a făcut un obicei (simpatic, zicem noi) de a împărtăși lumii ce a citit și i-a plăcut în fiecare an. Nici 2017 nu a făcut excepție și pentru că, după cum zicea și el, a avut mai mult timp la dispoziție pentru lectură, a citit mai mult și a recomandat 10 cărți care l-au cucerit.  Nouă ni s-a părut interesant topul lui și am decis să vă prezentăm aici cărțile mai pe larg, poate vreți și voi să citiți ceva din lista fostului președinte american. Noi deja avem în vedere câteva dintre ele. 🙂 Nu mă mai întind la povești și vă las lista:

1. The Power by Naomi Alderman

All over the world women are discovering they have the power. With a flick of the fingers they can inflict terrible pain – even death. Suddenly, every man on the planet finds they’ve lost control. The Day of the Girls has arrived – but where will it end? ‘Fascinating, ingenious, rattles with a furious pace. Deserves to be read by every woman (and, for that matter, every man)’ The Times

2. Grant by Ron Chernow

A dramatic portrait of one of America’s most compelling generals and presidents, Ulysses S. Grant, by Pulitzer Prize winner Ron Chernow, author of the book on which the astonishing musical Hamilton is based.

As late as April 1861, when the American Civil War broke out, Ulysses S. Grant was a dismal failure. A competent officer in the war against Mexico, he had resigned from the army over his drinking and had sunk into poverty as a civilian, losing all his money in hopeless investments. He had failed to secure the command of a volunteer unit and was about to return to his abject life working in his family’s leather-goods store when he was offered the colonelcy of an Illinois regiment. Less than four years later he was the commanding general of the victorious Union armies and was hailed as a military genius. He later served two terms as President of the United States. This is the epic biography of a very unheroic American hero, a modest, reticent and principled man who surprised the world and changed it for the better.

3. Evicted: Poverty and Profit in the American City by Matthew Desmond

*WINNER OF THE 2017 PULITZER PRIZE FOR NON-FICTION*
‘Beautifully written, thought-provoking, and unforgettable … If you want a good understanding of how the issues that cause poverty are intertwined, you should read this book’ Bill Gates, Best Books of 2017

Arleen spends nearly all her money on rent but is kicked out with her kids in Milwaukee’s coldest winter for years. Doreen’s home is so filthy her family call it ‘the rat hole’. Lamar, a wheelchair-bound ex-soldier, tries to work his way out of debt for his boys. Scott, a nurse turned addict, lives in a gutted-out trailer. This is their world. And this is the twenty-first century: where fewer and fewer people can afford a simple roof over their head.

4. Janesville: An American Story by Amy Goldstein

This is the story of what happens to an industrial town in the American heartland when its factory stills-but it’s not the familiar tale. Most observers record the immediate shock of vanished jobs, but few stay around long enough to notice what happens next, when a community with a can-do spirit tries to pick itself up. Pulitzer Prize winner Amy Goldstein has spent years immersed in Janesville, Wisconsin where the nation’s oldest operating General Motors plant shut down in the midst of the Great Recession, two days before Christmas of 2008. Now, with intelligence, sympathy, and insight into what connects and divides people in an era of economic upheaval, she makes one of America’s biggest political issues human.

5. Exit West by Mohsin Hamid

Fundamentalist Nadia and Saeed are two ordinary young people, attempting to do an extraordinary thing – to fall in love – in a world turned upside down. Theirs will be a love story but also a story about how we live now and how we might live tomorrow, of a world in crisis and two human beings travelling through it. Civil war has come to the city which Nadia and Saeed call home. Before long they will need to leave their motherland behind – when the streets are no longer useable and the unknown is safer than the known. They will join the great outpouring of people fleeing a collapsing city, hoping against hope, looking for their place in the world.

6. Five-Carat Soul by James McBride

The stories in Five-Carat Soul–none of them ever published before–spring from the place where identity, humanity, and history converge. They’re funny and poignant, insightful and unpredictable, imaginative and authentic–all told with McBride’s unrivaled storytelling skill and meticulous eye for character and detail. McBride explores the ways we learn from the world and the people around us. An antiques dealer discovers that a legendary toy commissioned by Civil War General Robert E. Lee now sits in the home of a black minister in Queens. Five strangers find themselves thrown together and face unexpected judgment.

7. Anything Is Possible by Elizabeth Strout

Anything Is Possible explores the whole range of human emotion through the intimate dramas of people struggling to understand themselves and others. Anything is Possible tells the story of the inhabitants of rural, dusty Amgash, Illinois, the hometown of Lucy Barton, a successful New York writer who finally returns, after seventeen years of absence, to visit the siblings she left behind.

8. Dying: A Memoir by Cory Taylor

In the year before her death, as she struggled with an untreatable illness, Cory Taylor began to write about her experiences, the patterns of her life, and of those she had lost. Dying is about vulnerability and strength, courage and humility, and anger. It is also about the acceptance that it takes to live a good life and say goodbye to it in peace.

9. A Gentleman in Moscow by Amor Towles

21 June 1922 Count Alexander Rostov – recipient of the Order of Saint Andrew, member of the Jockey Club, Master of the Hunt – is escorted out of the Kremlin, across Red Square and through the elegant revolving doors of the Hotel Metropol. Instead of being taken to his usual suite, he is led to an attic room with a window the size of a chessboard.

10. Sing, Unburied, Sing by Jesmyn Ward

Jojo is thirteen years old and trying to understand what it means to be a man. His mother, Leonie, is in constant conflict with herself and those around her. She is black and her children’s father is white. Embattled in ways that reflect the brutal reality of her circumstances, she wants to be a better mother, but can’t put her children above her own needs, especially her drug use.

Rich with Ward’s distinctive, lyrical language, Sing, Unburied, Sing brings the archetypal road novel into rural twenty-first century America. It is a majestic new work from an extraordinary and singular author.

Suntem curioși: ați citi vreo carte dintre cele listate mai sus? Sau nu vă potriviți la gusturi cu Barack Obama? 🙂 Colega noastră, Iulia, a citit deja A Gentleman in Moscow și o recomandă cu mare drag. Eu am pus ochii de ceva timp pe The Power dar încă nu am ajuns la ea, că am o listă de cărți de citit cam luuuuungă. Over and out! Așteptăm cu interes comentariile voastre.

P.S. Check out our Reading Challenge for 2018

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